Author Topic: Raspberry Pi  (Read 8705 times)

Zaq

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Raspberry Pi
« on: August 15, 2012, 06:45:42 pm »
These should work nicely with the RasPi for "real world" projects without messing with the RasPi GPIO
« Last Edit: August 15, 2012, 06:45:42 pm by Zaq »

vicary

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Raspberry Pi
« Reply #1 on: August 16, 2012, 12:49:28 am »
This is a very good expansion to the insufficient GPIO headers from RPi.

If you mess with GPIO headers, you should make use of every pins available while keeping the whole thing small (I personally do NOT recommend Gertboard for any projects).

Thanks for the shields available from the last update, people can skip the self assembling part for motors. Robot projects and can even do headless routine updates to the Arduino chip right from the RPi.

Great job on the DigiSpark. :)

Bluebie

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Raspberry Pi
« Reply #2 on: August 29, 2012, 10:16:45 pm »
Digispark would be a nice way to do this for projects which need a five volt interface. Definitely worth trying with the firmata arduino library. Still, the GPIO on the raspberry pi will be more suitable for devices requiring a 3v interface, and it has more pins available. Digispark\'s advantage over RPi GPIO is a few analog inputs and three pwm outputs versus one output on the RPi GPIO headers.

bboyes

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Raspberry Pi
« Reply #3 on: September 10, 2012, 08:35:50 am »
RPi is not intended for real-time I/O, which Arduino can do quite well. So using DigiSpark or other Arduino boards such as Teensy would be a great way to push off the hard-realtime tasks from RPi.

Bluebie

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Raspberry Pi
« Reply #4 on: October 03, 2012, 02:11:21 am »
RPi is open hardware - you can do what you like, including write software which runs directly on the device (instead of linux), which can do real time great. Another approach taken by an open source logic analyser for raspberry pi is to write a kernel extension which turns off interrupts and effectively freezes the system for however long it takes to complete the real time task.

For a lot of applications which would require real time on an arduino, it isn\'t necessary on a raspberry pi (which often runs at speeds of as much as 1000mhz, and is much faster at a lot of math - especially floating point). A raspberry pi does about 50 instructions in the space of a single instruction in an AVR. PixelPi is a great example of how this can work out alright. It\'s a python script which drives WS2801 LED strips from a Pi. These strips are notable for requiring constant data - their PWM is directly controlled by the clock signal, so it\'s pretty close to a real time problem and something an Arduino library can have a difficult time handling - but the Pi has so much power that even with dozens of other processes competing for CPU time the strips still work well: http://neophob.com/2012/08/pixelcontroller-and-raspberry-pi/

MichaelMeissner

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Raspberry Pi
« Reply #5 on: October 08, 2012, 01:22:23 pm »
Well Raspberry-pi is mostly open hardware.  I believe the graphics bit is closed source.

I would imagine you could run a more real-time OS if you need it on the Pi.  It just takes somebody to create the S/W.  A small matter of programming :-)

isdale

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Raspberry Pi
« Reply #6 on: January 09, 2013, 02:53:38 pm »
So has anyone gotten a Digispark to run on a Raspberry Pi?
Since DS has some python code to run it from a pc, could that run on the RP?
Hang a couple DS off an RP -- it would be a cool demonstration piece.

digistump

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Raspberry Pi
« Reply #7 on: January 09, 2013, 03:22:19 pm »
@isdale - I ahve several RPis and see no reason it won\'t work, libusb support is there, python support, etc all there - I will test it one I ship 3790 more packages....

Bluebie

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Raspberry Pi
« Reply #8 on: January 09, 2013, 04:03:18 pm »
I\'m running a digispark on a raspberry pi. I installed the regular Raspbian distribution, then upgraded ruby to 1.9.x using apt-get and made sure libusb 1.x was installed, then I installed my own digiusb rubygem and all of my digiusb ruby scripts are working great on there!

I don\'t know if there\'s a way to get the Arduino app to run on it.. you\'d need to recompile all of the avrgcc stuff inside it for arm, and I\'m not sure if it even can run on that architecture.

Mark

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Re: Raspberry Pi
« Reply #9 on: February 07, 2013, 10:46:06 am »
There is also these, http://wyolum.com/projects/alamode/

which have the advantage of Arduino for the i/o, and connect to the Pi GPIO.
The SD and RTC are an added bonus.


I've brought 2, but been too busy to try them out, so I lent one to a workmate.
Mark