Author Topic: Increase Load on Battery by Connecting Pins to Ground?  (Read 993 times)

Cosmos

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Increase Load on Battery by Connecting Pins to Ground?
« on: April 14, 2018, 06:33:26 pm »
Would it be safe to connect some resistors from the pins to ground on the Digispark Pro to increase the load on my battery? At the moment, my battery is automatically shutting off because the load is so small that it thinks nothing is connected. I was hoping to increase the load short of creating a dummy circuit in parallel with the Digispark.

Larsonut

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Re: Increase Load on Battery by Connecting Pins to Ground?
« Reply #1 on: April 18, 2018, 02:19:49 am »
I want to know this very much. Anyone know tell me Thanks for the reply in advance.


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« Last Edit: August 07, 2018, 02:34:38 am by Larsonut »

MrCookie

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Re: Increase Load on Battery by Connecting Pins to Ground?
« Reply #2 on: April 25, 2018, 03:43:28 am »
Would it be safe to connect some resistors from the pins to ground on the Digispark Pro to increase the load on my battery? At the moment, my battery is automatically shutting off because the load is so small that it thinks nothing is connected. I was hoping to increase the load short of creating a dummy circuit in parallel with the Digispark.
You should probably include more details...

I've never heard of a battery with a auto shut off. What is the current it seeks? Typically shunt resistors are low ohm, high wattage, and generate some heat. But without any specs it's hard to point to anything concrete.

Also, as you increase current draw, your going to cause your battery to voltage sag, depending on how high the battery voltage is, this may or may not matter.

There are alot of guides online for resistors in parallel, the problem is micro-controllers vary in load.

PeterF

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Re: Increase Load on Battery by Connecting Pins to Ground?
« Reply #3 on: May 14, 2018, 02:59:55 am »
They're probably talking about USB powerbanks, not 'batteries' ;)

It's probably not a good idea to just use resistors... the load needed to keep the powerbank on would generate quite a bit of heat and also be wasting quite of a bit of the energy you want.

Have a look at https://www.dorkbotpdx.org/blog/paul/battery_pack_load, where Paul did a nice two transistor oscillator which puts a pulsed load on the powerbank. You could also do the same thing with a spare pin and transistor, and resistor I suppose...